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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
dollars in cuts in spending based on our withdrawal from iraq and afghanistan. that's just not real. but i believe the result of negotiations with speaker boehner, senator mcconnell and senator reid they could arrive at a conclusion because the major objection that a lot of us had was we don't want to increase taxes. the majority leader reid has already made that concession in his proposal. >> schieffer: senator, the thing that i wonder about is i think the congressional leaders on both sides are ready to make a deal but what i wonder about is can the followers go along with the leaders or will the congress stumble into some kind of default here despite the best intentions of the leaders on both sides? >> i believe they can and will. how soon is... i'm not clear on. it may require some kind of a warning shot. for example, watch the markets tomorrow, the financial markets around the world. i believe that the american people have very different views about what we're in, but the major view is disdain and even larger than that is that they want us to sit down and agree to something because th
an answer that we never expected? >> i'm trying to get out of afghanistan to all places. that's where the money's at. >> i want to go, too. >> pelley: you're trying to go to afghanistan? what are you trying to do in afghanistan? >> rebuild. >> rebuild. >> make a living. >> pelley: how many people think there are opportunities in afghanistan? >> oh, i know it. >> pelley: turns out their aerospace skills fit the war, and the war fits their special sense of duty. >> these people maintained, built and operated a human space flight program and produced for the american people, produced the crown jewel for the united states, and that's what we want to do. >> pelley: how many of you expected to retire in the space program? everybody. how many of you have dipped into your retirement savings at this point? so you're spending your future that you were socking away. >> well, i figure the day i wake up dead, i won't go to work. >> the bottom line is there's not going to be anything for me to retire on. >> pelley: difficult as the jobs picture is tonight, there was celebration this morning here at
. obama says only courage will head off financial default now. assassination in afghanistan. mandy clark reports that president karzai's brother was gunned down. laid off on day one. cynthia bowers in a city so strapped it's firing cops as soon as they get their badge. and the first, first lady of the modern age, bill whitaker remembers betty ford who forever changed how america views the white house. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley reporting tonight from washington. >> pelley: good evening. it was a striking thing, today, to hear the president of the united states say that he cannot guarantee the 27 million social security checks that you are due to be mailed august 3rd. august 3rd is the day after the government will default on its debts if democrats and republicans do not agree to increase the nation's borrowing limit. both sides say they won't raise the limit without a deal to massively cut the federal deficit. a u.s. default would shake the world economy. the stakes could not be higher. time is growing short. in our interview, president o
, in the strongest possible terms, the assassination in afghanistan today of president hamid karzai's half brother, ahmed wali karzai, seen as the most powerful man in southern afghanistan was shot in his own home in kandahar by a man he knew and trusted. mandy clark is in kandahar. >> reporter: ahmad wali karzai was rushed to this kandahar hospital but with multiple gunshot wounds there was no chance he would survive. outside in the street lay the body of the man who had gotten through a tight ring of security to gun him down. >> my younger brother was murdered in his house this morning. president hamid karzai announced. ahmed wali karzai was a tribal council leader and considered the most powerful man in southern afghanistan. the attack stunned the city that has been hit by a series of targeted assassinations. this is the place, headquarters in kandahar city. moments ago word of the shooting came through as the police chief was wrapping up his interview with us and he rushed out to take charge. general abdul raziq told us that security was improving in the city when his two cell phones lit up at
afghanistan. the city's mayor was assassinated by a suicide bomber who hit a bomb-- hid a bomb in his turbin. cbs news correspondent mandy clark interviewed the mayor when she was in kandahar and included him in a story about an american soldier who is playing an unusual role there. here's her report. >> reporter: jim crawford may not look like it, but he's a u.s. army major, part of a program called "afghan hands," designed to mentor government officials. >> hey, how's it going? >> how you been? >> good, good. >> reporter: to break down barriers he wears local clothing and a full beard, mike most afghan men. when we visited kandahar earlier this month, crawford was anxious to introduce us to the city's mayor, ghulam haider hamidi. >> there are a lot of good afghans here working and working very hard and risking their life. he's one of them. so the people here are really lucky to have him as mayor. >> reporter: that luck ran out today. a suicide bomber got into the same corridor as the city hall the mayor had guide us through. on that day he told us he was fatalistic about the dangers he fac
clark in kandahar, afghanistan's most dangerous city. she comes under attack while wearing a berka. >> reporter: another stone was just thrown at me-- ow! >> just today the city's mayor was assassinated in a brazen attack. cell phone safety: to all those minutes add up to health problems for kids? dr. jon lapook reports. and it's a place where wounded warriors learn to hope again. david martin on the closing of walter reed. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> schieffer: good evening, scott's off tonight. i'm bob schieffer. the fallout from washington's inability to find a solution to the budget crisis and raise the debt limit has, apparently, begun. on wall street, the stock market was down for the third day in a row. the dow fell more than 198 point today. for the week, it's down nearly 400 points, and it has lost close to $105 billion in value. some of the bond rating services are now saying that even if congress does reach an agreement on a budget plan, it may be too late to avoid lowering the rating on some american securities. we ha
and afghanistan lie buried. nikki bunting brings her sons connor and cooper here every sunday. >> section 60 is very unique. it's not like any other cemetery you'll ever see. this specific section. there's so many young people, young kids so we kind of try to keep it a joyous place. >> reporter: her husband brian's headstone, like so many in section 60, marks a life cut short, a young family torn apart. but two-year-old cooper is proof life is stronger than death. i'm doing the math on cooper. explain that to me. >> he was our little r&r baby. he's the spitting image of my husband. it's really nice. >> reporter: brian was home on a so-called rest and recreation tour in february of 2009. shortly after he returned to afghanistan, he and three others were killed by a roadside bomber. >> at the time he was killed we didn't know that we were pregnant. so four days after i was notified of his death is when i found out that we were pregnant, so it was just such a miracle. it was the best news i could have ever received. >> reporter: cooper actually took his first step at his father's grave. >> righ
.s. commander in afghanistan on the future of the war and the decision to begin pulling out. the man accused of the worst war crimes in europe since the natsys shows nothing but contempt for justice. mark phillips has the pictures from the court. and on this fourth of july as the space shuttle program nears an end, jim axelrod asks "what happened to the flags on the moon?" >> it's beautiful. >> pelley: do those star spangled banners yet wave? captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, chantix is the most popular anti-smoking drug on the market with annual sales of nearly $800 million. but a study out today raises new safety questions about it. chantix has already been linked to an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and now to a higher risk of heart disease we asked dr. jon lapook to tell us what we need to know about these new findings. >> reporter: today's study is worrisome news for the more than seven million americans who have taken chantix. a new analysis links the pill to a 72% increase in the risk of heart problems. johns ho
. the families of british soldiers killed in afghanistan and iraq discovered they were on the list, too. >> if these actions are proved to have been verified, i'm appalled. i'm... i find it quite disgusting. >> reporter: all over the country, military families are now wondering if the "news of the world" had been snooping on them, too. tony phillipson, whose 29-year- old son james died in afghanistan in 2006, is convinced that reporters hacked into his dead son's email account. that was taken in afghanistan? he's now demanding the answer to the question everyone in britain is asking. >> what on earth did they expect to find? it's unbelievable. i can't rationalize it. it doesn't make any sense. >> reporter: all the anguish and the outrage is pushing authorities to act. we've just heard that andy coleson, who's the former editor of "the news of the world" and also, until recently, communications advisor to britain's prime minister, has been told by the police that he's going to be arrested tomorrow. scott? >> pelley: thanks, liz. with the d-day for default less than four weeks away, presi
in afghanistan said today the focus of the war is about to shift away from taliban strongholds in the south and to the eastern border with pakistan where al qaeda still operates. general david petraeus is retiring from the army later this month and will become the new director of the c.i.a. mandy clark spoke with him today in kabul about the way forward in afghanistan. >> reporter: the last days of general david petraeus's command have been marked by two major events: the president's decision to begin withdrawing u.s. forces and days later an audacious attack on one of kabul's most important hotels. general petraeus told us the assault should not be seen as a setback. do you really think that the afghan security forces are ready if they can't protect a major hotel in the cap all? >> i can tell you that our special forces who were sporp not leading and not doing-- for the afghan forces who saw the crisis response unit said that they responded very courageously. in fact, that they took the loss of life with the wounded in action i think underscores that fact. >> reporter: but the training of
in 2002 in pakistan and held at a secret prison in afghanistan known as the salt pit. hosed down and left in an unheated cell overnight, rahman died of hypothermia. neither prisoner had been singled out for special interrogation. they both apparently died of simple misuse or neglect. >> pelley: david, what are you hearing about the c.i.a.'s reaction to this today? >> reporter: well, this happens to be c.i.a. director leon panetta's last day on the job before he takes over as secretary of defense. none of this happened on his watch, but he is clearly pleased by the decision. he issued a statement, saying "we are now finally about to close this chapter in our agency's history." >> pelley: thank you, david. leon panetta will be taking over tomorrow for robert gates. today, president obama surprised the outgoing defense secretary with a going-away present: the medal of freedom, the nation's highest civilian award. gates was appointed by president george w. bush four and a half years ago and stayed on to help president obama manage the wars in iraq and afghanistan. we have done a number of sto
attacks against u.s. troops in afghanistan. two sources tell us that he was killed last month in pakistan by a u.s. drone. one official said to us today, "we know we got him this time." at the white house today, the president said he will begin sending condolence letters to families of troops who commit suicide in a war zone. troops who die in combat have always received this honor. but for generations, suicide victims have not been acknowledged by the president. the white house has been reviewing this policy, but mr. obama took action one week after elaine quijano first reported this story on our broadcast. elaine? >> reporter: well, scott, the president says he made the change to the condolence letter policy to remove the stigma associated with one of the unseen wounds of war-- suicide. in a written statement, the president said: the group iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, which has been advocating for more mental health programs for veterans, called the president's action long overdue. >> while we think this is a positive first step, i think a lot more needs to be done, that th
in to government computers. plans for the wars in iraq and afghanistan, secret information about american satellites, plans for a new fighter plane are gone, vacuumed up in computer hacking apparently by hostile governments. the confirmation came today in a speech in washington by deputy secretary of defense william lynn. >> to date, malicious cyber activity has been directed at nearly every sector of our infrastructure and economy. our national security correspondent david martin has been investigating and hi managed to get the first television camera ever into the pentagon's command center that defends against computer attacks. david also spoke to deputy secretary lynn about the information that's been lost. >> reporter: the joint strike fighter is the pentagon's high- priced ticket to air superiority for the 21st century. except four months ago the designs for that and other sophisticated weapons were stolen from defense industry computers by hackers-- 24,000 files in all. >> designs of satellites, u.a.v.s-- unmanned aerial vehicles-- cutting-edge military technology. >> reporter: is s
parties to the white house for talks on thursday. it was a deadly day for u.s. troops in afghanistan. three americans were killed and one was wounded when they were attacked by insurgents in the eastern part of the country. their afghan interpreter was also killed. most american families who lose a loved one in a war zone get a letter of condolence from the president of the united states. but there are a few who are denied that honor. among them, families of troops who commit suicide. we first reported this last week and tonight we have learned that the white house is changing its policy. elaine quijano brings us up to date with the father who led the fight to change the rules. >> i had many doubts. many, many doubts but we're very pleased. >> reporter: last week, greg kiessling got the call from the white house he'd waited nearly two years to receive. he learned his family's long wait for acknowledgment from the commander-in-chief was almost over. >> o'neil, my oldest son, came down, we had a hug and it was very emotional. and "dad, it's going to happen." and that was very good mome
a new lease on life. marine sergeant jimmy childers lost a leg to a roadside bomb in afghanistan that also left him with traumatic brain injury. he was prone to angry outbursts into p-2-v paired him with tidus. childers looked into getting a dog trained to work with the disabled but was told it would take more than a year. anyway he says that's not what he needed. >> i don't need a dog to grab my prosthetic leg. >> reporter: the dog gives him what he does need. >> he gives me back unconditional love. no judgment. >> reporter: the demand is never ending on both sides. there's 18 veterans that commit suicide every day in this country. there's one animal that's put to sleep every eight seconds. >> reporter: dave sharpe puts the two together to save each other's lives. chip reid, cbs news, washington. >> schieffer: dogs are the best. for scott and all of us at cbs news i'm bob schieffer. we'll see you at 9:00 eastern time for president obama's address and the republican response from house speaker john boehner. good night. captioning sponsored by cbs captioned by media access group a
would be targeted for supporting the u.s. war in afghanistan. then after a norwegian newspaper reprinted cartoons of the prophet mohammed in 2006, once again al qaeda called for revenge. then last july, three alleged al qaeda operatives were arrested inside norway for plotting to hit targets there. but i have to say, there have been no claims of responsibility. u.s. officials say right now there's no solid evidence this is al qaeda. there's a wide field of suspects, including political radicals. >> schieffer: okay. well, thank you very much, bob. bob orr in washington. well, yes, it is july, and it's supposed to be hot in july. but it's hard to remember it being this hot. today the east coast got a full dose of the heat wave that's blamed for 34 deaths nationwide. in new york and atlantic city, the temperature actually hit 104. baltimore and washington saw 105, and it felt a lot hotter. here's jim axelrod. >> reporter: in the last week, 1,472 temperature records have been set or tied across the country. newark, new jersey, hit 108 degrees-- the highest temperature ever recorded there. >>
't get the help they needed must change." the group iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, which has been advocating for more mental health programs for veterans, called the president's action long overdue. >> while we think this is a positive first step, i think a lot more needs to be done, that the white house really needs to redouble its resolve to addressing this suicide epidemic head on. >> would not try to seek honor, nor was he being a coward. >> reporter: if anyone can be credited with changing the policy it's greg and janet keesling, they have been fighting for the change since 2009. that's the year their son, 25-year-old army specialist chance keesling, killed himself on his second tour in iraq. they say acknowledgement from the president gives them some comfort. >> he was a good soldier. so i think that's the part that i want to know that the country appreciates, that he fought, he did everything he was asked to do. >> reporter: but there are still military families who will not be receiving condolence letters. the policy change does not include suicide or training acciden
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)